Connexient

  • The Start of a New Era

    Connexient started with a simple question and idea in the summer of 2012:  "Why can't we have indoor GPS?".   That question came from our co-founders long experience with hospital wayfinding systems, and a conviction that digital mapping and turn-by-turn indoor navigation could finally truly solve the pain point of wayfinding inside of large, complex hospitals that signage and kiosks could only partially address.

    Innovation is hard!   When we asked this question, the technology to achieve navigation quality indoor positioning did not exist.  It took us until January, 2015 to get to our first commercial release of the Navigator Edition, leveraging the breakthrough of Bluetooth Low Energy beacons.   

    Since then, we have deployed over 30 hospitals and 50 million square feet of indoor maps and navigation, at sites all over the country.   While it has been tremendously gratifying to see this, we realize that we are still just at the beginning.    The official launch of our customer portal this month marks an important milestone to start the next stage of our journey

    Continual Improvement through Collaboration

    The launch of our customer portal was driven by two fundamental principles and values that Connexient embraces.

    1) Kaizen   

    Kaizen, the Japanese word for "change for the good" encapsulates the principle of continual incremental improvement.  At Connexient, we are committed to that spirit and philosophy. 

    At each new site, we have learned more about how to deliver a reliable, robust and intuitive solution at scale in facilities of enormous size and complexity.   Often we encountered and had to solve new technical and user experience challenges created by unique characteristics of a particular campus and facility.  

    We put our learning back in to our product development, as well as tools and practices for improving our deployment and ability to support and maintain MediNav once deployed.   This portal and our new customer user group will be a place where we can communicate and share with our customers the challenges we are working on, or have identified and our studying.  Even more importantly, we can also get direct feedback on where and how we can improve.

    2) Collaboration 

    Connexient is a customer-driven company, and collaboration with our customers is a core goal.   We have always believed that in order for MediNav to be successful, we must work together with them.   That was true during the initial deployment stage of MediNav, and it is even more important after launch that we collaborate to achieve solution success.

    Today, for most of our customers, this will be focused on sharing knowledge, ideas, insights and best practices on marketing and simple Web 2.0 integrations that will increase awareness and adoption by patients and visitors.  For some customers, we will do the same for more sophisticated integrations with EHR systems such as Epic.  The portal will then be place where the trailblazers can make the path easier for those that follow.   Some customers are even moving towards addressing other Enterprise use cases for Indoor Maps and Navigation Services through integrations with asset tracking, facility management, safety & security applications.

    Whatever their goals, we will work to ensure that our customer portal will become a valuable tool and vehicle for helping our customers to achieve them.  

    Getting Started

    So, today is just the starting point.   While we have our ideas, the continued evolution of the portal will be driven by what we hear and learn from our customers,   We are eager to start this next stage of the journey to improve Patient Experience and drive innovation and efficiency with MediNav! 

  • Campaign Designed to Knock Your Socks Off with Compassionate Compression Kits

    NEW YORK (NOVEMBER 27, 2018) -- Connexient announced today a #GivingTuesday partnership with Hackensack Meridian Health.  On Tuesday, November 27, Connexient will deliver over 1,000 compassionate compression kits to patients being treated at Hackensack University Medical Center. The kits include a pair of stylish compression socks, an eye mask and ear plugs packaged in a clear zippered bag.  Compression socks increase circulation, decrease swelling and reduce the risk of blood clots.

    (Left to right) Connexient CEO, Mark Green was joined by Hackensack Meridian Health co-CEO, Bob Garret; Hackensack University Medical Center FACHE, President of Population Health at Hackensack Meridian Health, Mark D. Sparta; Vice President Hospitality Services at Hackensack Meridian Health Kunle Modupeand Joe Motta, co-founder and President at Connexient.

    “We wanted to do something meaningful for those who won’t be home for the holidays this year,” said Connexient co-founder and president, Joe Motta.  “By giving Hackensack patients compassionate compression kits, we’re hopefully providing comfort during their treatment and recovery.”

    #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving fueled by social media and collaboration. It falls after Black Friday and Cyber Monday and reminds us to get in the holiday spirit by helping our friends, families, colleagues and communities.  

    “We are thrilled Connexient thought of us for this #GivingTuesday campaign,” said Peter Hughes, vice president of Strategic Partnerships at Hackensack Meridian Health.  “It’s a great gift for our patients and a nice way to engage our team members to help distribute the compassionate kits. This partnership knocks our socks off.”

    Knock your socks off is a saying that can be traced back to 1856 when a newspaper described a flu remedy as defeating the common cold virus by knocking its socks off.  In more recent years, it became a positive phrase meaning that you were impressed or delightfully surprised by something.

    About Connexient:  Connexient (www.connexient.com ) provides indoor mapping, navigation and location-based services for Hackensack Meridian Health, among other hospital networks.  Connexient’s MediNav™ patient experience solution provides the world’s most advanced turn-by-turn indoor navigation with popular features like Parking Planner, Find My Car and Meet Me. This innovative technology helps hospitals increase customer satisfaction and loyalty, reduce missed or late appointments and improve HCAHPS scores.

    About Hackensack Meridian Health:

    Hackensack Meridian Health is a leading not-for-profit health care organization that is the largest, most comprehensive and truly integrated health care network in New Jersey, offering a complete range of medical services, innovative research and life-enhancing care.

    Hackensack Meridian Health comprises 16 hospitals from Bergen to Ocean counties, which includes three academic medical centers – Hackensack University Medical Center in Hackensack, Jersey Shore University Medical Center in Neptune, JFK Medical Center in Edison; two children’s hospitals - Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital in Hackensack, K. Hovnanian Children’s Hospital in Neptune; nine community hospitals - Ocean Medical Center in Brick, Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank, Mountainside Medical Center in Montclair, Palisades Medical Center in North Bergen, Raritan Bay Medical Center in Perth Amboy, Southern Ocean Medical Center in Manahawkin, Bayshore Medical Center in Holmdel, Raritan Bay Medical Center in Old Bridge, and Pascack Valley Medical Center in Westwood; and two rehabilitation hospitals - JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute in Edison and Shore Rehabilitation Institute in Brick.

    Additionally, the network has more than 450 patient care locations throughout the state which include ambulatory care centers, surgery centers, home health services, long-term care and assisted living communities, ambulance services, lifesaving air medical transportation, fitness and wellness centers, rehabilitation centers, urgent care centers and physician practice locations. Hackensack Meridian Health has 33,000 team members, and 6,500 physicians and is a distinguished leader in health care philanthropy, committed to the health and well-being of the communities it serves.

    The network’s notable distinctions include having one of only five major academic medical centers in the nation to receive Healthgrades America’s 50 Best Hospitals Award for five or more consecutive years, four hospitals among the top 10 in New Jersey by U.S. News and World Report. Other honors include consistently achieving Magnet® recognition for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center, recipient of the John M. Eisenberg Award for Patient Safety and Quality from The Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum, a six-time recipient of Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For,” one of the “20 Best Workplaces in Health Care” in the nation, and the number one “Best Place to Work for Women.” The network was also named to Becker’s Healthcare’s “150 Top Places to Work in Healthcare/2018” list.

    Hackensack Meridian Health partnered with Seton Hall University to launch the first private medical school in New Jersey – Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University - in more than 50 years to address a growing shortage of physicians and dramatic changes in health care delivery. Additionally, the network partnered with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer to find more cures for cancer faster while ensuring that patients have access to the highest quality, most individualized cancer care when and where they need it. Hackensack Meridian Health and Carrier Clinic, New Jersey’s oldest and most respected behavioral health provider, signed a definitive agreement to merge.

    Hackensack Meridian Health is a member of AllSpire Health Partners, an interstate consortium of leading health systems, to focus on the sharing of best practices in clinical care and achieving efficiencies.


    For additional information, please visit www.HackensackMeridianHealth.org.

  • If you have visited us before, you most likely noticed a few updates and improvements! One of the most important, of course, is this blog - which is just the first step in an area of our Web site dedicated to providing valuable information and resource links to those seeking to learn more about Indoor Mapping, Digital Wayfinding and Location-Based Services.

    If you have visited us before, you most likely noticed a few updates and improvements! One of the most important, of course, is this blog - which is just the first step in an area of our Web site dedicated to providing valuable information and resource links to those seeking to learn more about Indoor Mapping, Digital Wayfinding and Location-Based Services.

    The other major update is a bit more newsworthy: Connexient will be previewing our new API + SDKat HiMSS 2014, which is available now to Alpha partners and will be released in late Q2, 2014.

    Finally, if you are going to HiMSS 2014, please come see us there and find out what all the buzz is about! In addition to our own booth, we will be showcasing MediNav's integration with Cisco CMX at the Cisco booth.

    Stay tuned for more update and announcements to come!

  • Giving Tuesday (November 27th) is a global day of giving – it reminds us to get in the holiday spirit by helping out family, friends, colleagues and communities.

    Connexient co-founders Mark Green and Joe Motta partnered with their colleagues at Hackensack Meridian Health to deliver 1,000 compassionate compression kits to patients.  Each kit includes a pair of stylish compression socks, an eye mask and ear plugs. Compression socks are great post-operation and during treatment as they increase circulation, decrease swelling and reduce the risk of blood clots.

    “We wanted to do something meaningful for those who won’t be home for the holidays this year,” said Connexient co-founder and president, Joe Motta.  “By giving patients at Hackensack University Medical Center compassionate compression kits, we’re hopefully providing comfort during their treatment and recovery.”

    (Left to right)  Connexient CEO, Mark Green was joined by Hackensack Meridian Health co-CEO, Bob Garret; Hackensack University Medical Center FACHE, President of Population Health at Hackensack Meridian Health, Mark D. Sparta; Vice President Hospitality Services at Hackensack Meridian Health Kunle Modupe and Joe Motta, co-founder and President at Connexient.

    Connexient provides indoor GPS for the Hackensack University Medical Center Campus, and is rolling out across the Hackensack Meridian Health network.. Finding your way through massive hospitals and medical centers can be stressful.  Not to mention, getting lost can result in late or missed appointments, a problem that costs hospitals over $150B annually in the US. Connexient’s MediNav™ patient experience solution provides true turn-by-turn indoor navigation and works like Google Maps or Waze but for indoors. Now, patients, visitors and staff have an indoor guide on their phone to help them reach their destination.

  • We are delighted to share this promotional video of the Memorial Sloan Kettering MSK Compass application powered by MediNav!   Memorial Sloan Kettering has a strong vision for the key role that Digital Wayfinding and Indoor Navigation can play in enhancing Patient Experience today, and driving innovations and efficiency across the Enterprise in the future.    We look forward to the official launch of MSK Compassand the next steps in our collaboration.

     

  • MediNav isn’t necessarily changing the world, but we’re contributing to the larger global navigation picture… indoor navigation is becoming just as important as finding your way outdoors. Hospitals are just one area Connexient is focusing on. Other companies are developing wayfinding apps for airports, stadiums, college campuses and malls. How many times have you gone to a new city or foreign country and typed your destination into Waze or Google Maps without thinking much about how difficult it used to be using Rand McNally Road Atlases? Now that’s an old school reference!

     

    Connexient CEO & Co-Founder, Mark Green

    Bio:

    Mark Green has spent over 30 years as a highly successful sales executive and leader in both Enterprise software and wayfinding industries. This includes serving as VP, Sales and building the sales team and revenue ramp for a $2B+ IPO with Silknet Software. Post-IPO, Mark was instrumental in the $4.2B acquisition of Silknet by Kana Communications, where Mark became Vice President, Strategic Accounts of the combined company. Mark was also VP, Sales at Relicore, which had a successful exit when acquired by Symantec. Mark served as CEO of GDS, Inc. for 6 years before co-founding Connexient. Mark is a graduate of Colby College.

    1. Can you tell us what brought you to this specific career path?

    I’ve been involved with growing start-ups in both healthcare and enterprise software throughout my entire career.  My business partner, Joe Motta and I have a hospital wayfinding and graphic design business called GDS. As the proliferation of outdoor GPS platforms emerged (MapQuest, Google Maps and Waze), we innovated a mobile app called MediNav; it is a revolutionary solution for digital wayfinding in hospitals.

    2. What is the most interesting story that happened since you began your career?

    The most interesting and successful story of my career was when I was with the senior management team that sold Silknet Software to Kana Communications for $4.2B.  At the time (2000) it was the second largest software acquisition ever. Since then, it’s been fun growing companies especially innovating with Connexient to develop and implement the best “Indoor GPS for hospital patients.”

    3. What bleeding edge technological breakthroughs are you working on?  How do they help people?

    The bleeding edge technological breakthrough that we’re innovating at Connexient addresses how to position and navigate someone on their smartphone inside a 5 million square foot hospital with multiple levels and several buildings.  Our mission is to make the patient experience stress-free by providing blue dot turn-by-turn navigation. We are helping people find their way to their appointments, plus we have parking planner and meet up features that can also be integrated in the hospital’s app.

    4. How do you think you might change the world?

    MediNav isn’t necessarily changing the world, but we’re contributing to the larger global navigation picture… indoor navigation is becoming just as important as finding your way outdoors. Connexient is focused on healthcare and hospitals whereas other companies are developing wayfinding solutions for airports, stadiums, college campuses and malls. How many times have you gone to a new city or foreign country and typed your destination into Waze or Google Maps without thinking much about how difficult it used to be using Rand McNally Road Atlases?  Now that’s an old school reference!

    5. Keeping Black Mirror in mind, can you see any potential drawbacks about this technology that people should think more deeply about?

    There are always concerns about user privacy when dealing with mobile devices, but Connexient keeps everything anonymous.  I don’t see this as a drawback because we don’t know whom the end user is; we just help them get to where they need to go.

    6. What was the tipping point that led you to this technology?

    The tipping point that led us to MediNav was realizing that people would come to expect the same type of mapping and navigation experience indoors, as they get outdoors.  Using Google Maps or Waze while driving has become a way of life.

    7. What do you need to lead this technology to widespread adoption?

    Widespread adoption is in the works. We need to collaborate with our hospital clients on marketing strategies to promote the wayfinding app, once they’ve launched it on the app stores. We’re also integrating MediNav with EHR systems and appointment scheduling apps like Epic’s MyChart. That will increase the adoption of our solution significantly.

    8. What have you been doing to publicize this idea?  Marketing strategies?

    We are building awareness through a host of marketing and PR strategies, including: digital and content marketing, social media, testimonials… we’re very proud of our Giving Tuesday initiative with Hackensack Meridian Health. We donated over 1,000 compassionate compression kits to be distributed to patients at Hackensack University Medical Center over the holidays beginning on Tuesday, November 27th (aka GivingTuesday).  The kits included: a pair of compression socks, an eye mask and ear plugs. Compression socks are great for post-op and recovery because they help increase circulation; decrease swelling and muscle soreness, while reducing the risk of DVT.  This charitable act of kindness is an example of how we are giving the gift of compassion to patients alongside our largest customer. http://www.connexient.com/

    9. Who is your mentor(s)?

    My greatest mentor has been my father. He’s an accomplished academic who taught me the importance of hard work and a well-written thank you letter.  From a business perspective, my mentor was Jay Wood, who was the CEO of Silknet software while I was VP of Sales. Now, he’s a filmmaker on the West Coast (aka Family Guy).

    10. How have you used success to bring goodness to the world?

    The GivingTuesday campaign Connexient spearheaded with Hackensack Meridian Health is the best example of us “collectively” bringing goodness to the world.  On a personal, every day level, I treat employees with the same level of respect, as a client or someone in my family. Connexient’s core values are closely aligned with my own:  respect, gratitude, honesty, courage, integrity and excellence are the top five.

    11. What are five things I wish someone told me before I started this journey and why?  

    The five things I wish someone told me before I started Connexient:  1.) it’s a marathon – pace yourself 2.) anticipate challenges and set-backs – learn how to pivot 3.) hire well and delegate 4.) surround yourself with a skilled team of professionals 5.) Stay true to your vision.

    12. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be?

    If I could inspire a movement it would be to make education available to everyone. Whether that’s through formal academics or mentorship in a specific trade… I think many of the problems in our society could be solved with education and mentorship. I try to be a good mentor to my three adult children and my employees.

    13. Can you please share your favorite life lesson quote?

    “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life,” – Steve Jobs.

    14. If you had 60 seconds to make a pitch to a VC, what would you say?

    Have you ever gotten lost in a hospital?  You’re not alone. Nearly every patient or visitor has experienced getting lost. Finding your way through the massive maze-like facilities and medical centers can be stressful.  Getting lost can also result in missed or late appointments – a problem that costs hospitals over $150B annually in the United States. Connexient is an innovative technology company that developed a revolutionary solution called MediNav™ and it’s indoor GPS for hospitals.  This true turn-by-turn bluedot navigation provides voice prompts, off-route notification and more – just like what billions of users have come to enjoy and expect in the outdoor world with Google Maps, Apple or Waze. But now they can have an indoor guide to help them reach their appointment.

    MediNav is powered by Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons and sophisticated sensor fusion technology.  Connexient closed its Series A funding in Q4 2017 from Riverside Acceleration Capital.

    15. How can our readers follow you on social media?

    Readers can follow us on Twitter @Connexient and on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/company/connexient/

  • Hot Desks and cross department teams are making workplaces trickier to get around. For Exxon Mobil, and others the solution is a wayfinding app

    January 7, 2020

    NEPTUNE, N.J.— Firas Ajam has been a resident physician at Jersey Shore University Medical Center for three years, but he’s still unfamiliar with parts of the 26-acre, 3 million-square-foot campus.

    When a patient got sick a few months ago in a unit where Dr. Ajam had never been, he navigated using a Waze-like app on his smartphone. He ran through the hospital listening to the app’s directions and watching the map as it tracked his location, down to about 3 feet, to guide him through the labyrinth of hallways.

    “I was there within three minutes, and I was the first one,” Dr. Ajam says.

    GPS and satellites help people navigate on streets but can’t penetrate through walls. The MediNav app, built by startup Connexient Inc., helps hospital workers get to their indoor destinations. It uses small battery-operated radio transmitters, or beacons, which transmit signals over Bluetooth from the tiny accelerometer and compass components of Dr. Ajam’s phone. The app also lets him search for the nearest wheelchair, gurney or IV pump, and guides him with on-screen and voice directions. It’s free for users; the hospital paid an initial setup fee and undisclosed annual licensing fee.

    Wayfinding apps similar to Waze and GoogleMaps could someday spare workers from getting lost inside mazelike workplaces. A few companies already use them to help workers find conference rooms, restrooms, even colleagues. In the future, the apps could become commonplace, prompted by advances in location-detection technology and trends shaping the workforce. The rise in remote work means that offices are less familiar. People from different divisions, such as marketing and technology, are collaborating more. Assigned desks are giving way to “hot desks,” quiet booths and communal areas. And employees, particularly Gen-Z and millennials, expect their work tools to be as intuitive as the apps and websites they use as consumers.

    Wayfinding apps similar to Waze and GoogleMaps could someday spare workers from getting lost inside mazelike workplaces. A few companies already use them to help workers find conference rooms, restrooms, even colleagues. In the future, the apps could become commonplace, prompted by advances in location-detection technology and trends shaping the workforce. The rise in remote work means that offices are less familiar. People from different divisions, such as marketing and technology, are collaborating more. Assigned desks are giving way to “hot desks,” quiet booths and communal areas. And employees, particularly Gen-Z and millennials, expect their work tools to be as intules/its-the-realitive as the apps and websites they use as consumers.

    Wayfinding apps similar to Waze and GoogleMaps could someday spare workers from getting lost inside mazelike workplaces. PHOTO: NICHOLAS CALCOTT FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

    In the coming years, employers could use location data to assist during emergencies, like a fire or shooting, or to identify when people are in areas they shouldn’t be. Companies could also use the apps to ensure workers use their time effectively, lawyers say. “I would think that the main impetus behind these apps is really for tracking of productivity,” says Ifeoma Ajunwa, assistant professor of labor and employment law at Cornell University. Eventually, wayfinding apps could work on augmented-reality headsets or smart contact lenses, if those technologies catch on.

    However, a worker’s location data could be exposed in a cyberattack if it hasn’t been properly secured and anonymized, says Samantha Ettari, a trial lawyer at Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP, who advises companies on information governance, cybersecurity and data privacy. Revealing the exact location of workers could uncover elicit workplace relationships, confidential business deals and secret union meetings, lawyers say. It also isn’t clear how many employees will use the apps.

    Exxon Mobil Corp. plans to offer a wayfinding app by the end of March for 10,000 employees at its Houston campus, which covers 4.5 million square feet across 23 buildings. The app, made with Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc., or Esri, can detect a worker’s phone position within about 3 feet using Wi-Fi signals and beacons.

    Workers at the company, who mostly lack assigned offices, can choose from four different types of workstations, including glass-encased quiet seats and huddle spaces. “Having the ability to find where people are when they’re not tethered to their desks is huge,” says Charles Whiteley III, a technology supervisor at Exxon’s environmental and property solutions division. The app will also give workers the best routes to minimize time outside in a rainstorm or summer heat, or if they need elevators or ramps.

    Ultimately, Exxon plans to use the app to optimize routes for technicians fixing broken equipment, saving them time, Mr. Whiteley says. If enough workers use it, the app could generate data that, along with data from identification badges and WiFi-connected devices, could help determine how to allocate office space, he says.

    Aruba, a subsidiary of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. , uses a wayfinding app to prevent employees at its Santa Clara, Calif., office from running over time in conference rooms. Lights flash five minutes before a meeting is supposed to end if sensors that communicate with the app find employees are still in the room, says Keerti Melkote, president of intelligent edge for HPE and founder of Aruba. So far, employers say use of the apps is optional, and they limit how they track workers.

    Data generated from hospital staff using the MediNav app is anonymous and isn’t stored on Connexient’s servers, says David Reis, chief information officer at Hackensack Meridian Health, a hospital network that includes Jersey Shore University Medical Center.

    For the entire article, click on the following link: https://www.wsj.com/articles/waze-for-work-navigation-apps-come-to-the-office-11578398400?mod=foesummaries

    Connexient CEO, Mark Green is featured in WSJ reporter, Sara Castellanos’ Future of the Workplace podcast on January 15th

    The MediNav app at Jersey Shore University Medical Center uses small battery-operated radio transmitters, or beacons, which transmit signals over Bluetooth from the tiny accelerometer and compass components of workers’ smartphones. PHOTO: NICHOLAS CALCOTT FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

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Connexient LLC

210 West 29th Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 763-6604 | (888) 850-4920
sales@connexient.com